Tuesday, September 12, 2017

Tabby Tuesday

It's Tuesday, and today we're all about the tabbies!


Thimble, the model that she is, wanted to show off her tabby stripes. On both sides of her cute little face, of course.


Did you know that the term classic tabby refers to those with very bold, swirled markings that are more like large blotches than stripes? Tabbies like Thimble, with the distinctive stripes up and down the body, are actually called mackerel tabbies. Spotted tabbies have markings that are, indeed, more so in the shape of spots rather than stripes. There are also ticked tabbies, who do not have distinctive stripes or spots except for on the face and legs. (For those who might remember seeing full-body shots of Eddy, she is almost a ticked tabby, but perhaps has just enough vague stripes on her body to barely be considered a mackerel tabby.) And we can't forget the patched tabbies, most easily described as tortoiseshell or calico cats with tabby patches.

So, in case you were hoping for a lesson on tabbies today, there you go!

Happy Tuesday to all!


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Our Doodle of the Day:


(Librarian Thimble has a bit of a book hoarding problem. Much like her momma.)



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Our Tip of the Day:
While vaccines can be important for the prevention of various diseases, especially for those furbabies who go outside and are most susceptible, it is still crucial that you be knowledgeable of the potential side effects of some vaccines. In some cases, vaccines can lead to injection-site tumors, such as cancerous sarcomas. To help prevent this, you might keep furbabies, like your kitties, indoors, so that some vaccines may not be necessary since the furbaby is less likely to be exposed to the related diseases. In other cases, such as in the case of a dog or cat who goes outdoors, always do your research. Look into the types of vaccines offered, and ask your veterinary office what types of vaccines they use. Some vaccines do not contain the adjuvant components typically believed to cause injection-site lumps or tumors, so try to check with your veterinarian on the possibility of using potentially safer vaccines. Vaccines are often a highly debated subject in any case, so always be knowledgeable about them, about what kind your veterinary office uses, and which vaccines your furbaby might need.

11 comments:

  1. Love those tabby stripes, Thimble! Thanks for the lesson on tabbies too--"patched tabbies" was a new one to me. :)

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  2. Thimble, you are the purrfect example of a tabbycat! :)

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  3. Veterinarian's should know to give vaccines in the leg now, just in case of cancer. A leg is easier to remove than the back of the neck!

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  4. You have beautiful markings, Thimble ! Purrs

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  5. Thank you for the tabby lesson :) Thimble is adorable. I love the drawing and it makes me think of my great-niece, she loves to say mine ( at 22 months she has not yet mastered sharing :) ). Great tips on vaccines. I only do rabies and I do the 3 yr, no adjuvant.

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  6. thimble; yur markingz R total lee kewl ~~~~ gram paw dude had way awesum side markingz az well !! ☺☺♥♥

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  7. Thimble should be a super model :) I didn't realize the difference in tabbies until I read about it in a book a few years ago (the rest of the book was not worth reading - but I loved the tabby section). A couple months ago, someone messaged our page asking what Bear is because they want a cat just like him. I was befuddled - he's a tabby! Any shelter has TONS of tabbies! Just to make it easier - I pointed out that he's a mackerel tabby - I never heard back from the lady, but I hope she found what she was looking for ... tabbies are one-of-a-kind!

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  8. Mudpie's mommy has a book hoarding problem too! You are such a little doll, Thimble.

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  9. Thimble, you most certainly are a beautiful mackerel tabby, sweet girl.

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  10. You look the perfect tabby. How could we fail to fall in love.

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