Tuesday, December 29, 2020

Tonks and Yet Another Christmas Tree

Tonks is still enjoying her beloved Christmas trees, and I actually got a rare shot of her sitting beside one of the trees instead of climbing it.


I'm pretty sure Tonks started climbing the tree just moments after this photo was snapped. Not surprising.

Merry Fifth Day of Christmas, friends!


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Festive Flashback Doodle of the Day




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Tip of the Day

Yesterday we discussed feeding feral and stray cats outdoors in the cold winter months. As we mentioned yesterday, dry food is a good option in the winter, as it will not freeze like moist food. However, moist food still has its benefits, and so today we're here to give some tips on how to feed moist food outdoors in the cold months with at least some success. To begin, you can resort to putting moist food out only when you know the cat or cats you feed are present, so that they will be able to eat it immediately, giving it little to no time to freeze. Sometimes, though, you might not know when a feral or stray cat will show up for a meal. In such cases, there are ways to potentially offer moist food to ferals and strays, without the moist food freezing rapidly.

To begin, you can simply check on the status of moist food as often as possible, and warm or replace food that has become frozen. What's more, a source of heat will obviously help keep moist food from freezing at a fast rate, although you of course have to ensure that this source of heat is safe. This could mean doing something as simple as warming the bowl in which you put the moist food, or warming the moist food itself, to a safe temperature. There are also both electric and non-electric heat sources that can work for keeping bowls and their contents warm. For example, there are microwavable or otherwise warmable heating pads that can be placed under bowls to help prevent the rapid freezing of moist food that is fed to outdoor cats in the winter. There are also electric heated bowls that could keep moist food warm enough to prevent freezing. Other options of course include using a more extensive heat source within an entire feeding station or shelter, details which we will further discuss in upcoming tips. One important detail, though, as we mentioned just a few moments ago, is ensure that any heat source you use is safe and that it will not cause burns or fires. Always do your research before using any item that entails electricity and heating, and choose and use accordingly and wisely.

The last note to make here is that you should still of course make sure that moist food is not spoiling, such as if it manages to get too warm or sits out for too long. If a heated bowl or heat pad causes moist food to remain warm for long periods of time, do be sure to remove any uneaten food prior to spoilage. It might be cold outside during the winter months, but depending on the methods you use and the duration of time that outdoor cats' moist food is sitting out, it is always best to be aware of the potential for gastrointestinal or other issues that could result from the consumption of spoiled food.

9 comments:

The Island Cats said...

Isn't it fun to climb the tree, Tonks?

Eastside Cats said...

Tonks is a cutie!
The PO'M gobbles his food, so I haven't yet worried about it freezing on him!
But we've had a mild Winter up to this point.

The Florida Furkids said...

Mom is happy that we leave the tree alone!!

The Florida Furkids

Marv, Jo Jo, Komo, Cinnamon & Angel Nellie said...

Tonks! We say go for it! We have left our tree alone this year. Mom is very happy!
Purrs
Marv, Jo Jo, Kozmo, Cinnamon and Barb

Helen said...

I'm so glad dogs don't climb trees. I'd have to hang the tree from the ceiling.

Melissa, Mudpie and Angel Truffles (Mochas, Mysteries and Meows) said...

She's just too adorable.

pilch92 said...

Tonks is such a cutie. I like the drawing too. And excellent tips, as always. I am glad there are no ferals near us, but my heart goes out to all there are everywhere. XO

meowmeowmans said...

Haha. We bet she did, too!

messymimi said...

It sounds like you might want to give in and have a greenhouse indoors for the cats. They would appreciate it.